Wednesday, June 3, 2009

Enduring Style - An Aesthete's Lament


Aesthete's Lament popped on the scene not long after I began blogging.  Briefly, the mysterious Aesthete pulled the plug.  Suddenly "Page Not Found" and I felt a moment of panic.  Not long after the blog returned and I have counted on it ever since to inform and delight.


The writing on An Aesthete's Lament is half the fun, but for this exercise it was succinct and clear.


"Jacque Grange - 

 - nobody is in top form so often."


Indeed.

"Jaime Parladé  (of Malaga, Spain)- unbelievably genius." 


"Rose Tarlow 

Enough said.
In addition, Aesthete named Isabel López-Quesada saying, "Her work is sublime, like Grange, only with a warmth and feminine gutsiness."  Unfortunately her website is being revamped and I could only find one image on-line.  I did stumble across a mention that Carolina Herrera frequents her shop in Madrid.  I'm setting my bookmark and waiting for the site to launch; based on the references it should be worth the wait.

It's interesting that three of the four picks are European, which raises an issue of another reader, "The problem has to do with what is featured, or rather not featured, in shelter magazines of American publishers. Gone are the days when one could see what Deeda Blair, Susan Gutfreund or Gayfryd Steinberg are up to in their own ivory towers. When Marian McEvoy, who featured such style setters, was kicked out, the Hearst Corportation threw out the Babes with the bath water, didn't they? Not a chance in hell that we'll ever get to see anything that didn't fit a formula or is not done by a conventionally professional designer. "

Tomorrow we'll hear from the House of Beauty and Culture and a frequent reader and commenter, Magnaverde.

Top three images of Grange's Paris apartment, Architectural Digest.  Remaining two images from the Mark Hotel website.  Parlade's image via Katie Did, originally AD.  Rose Tarlow's work is from her book, The Private House.  And, sadly, I have lost track of the site with the image of the bathroom by Isabel Lopez-Quesada.  Forgive me.

19 comments:

Cote de Texas said...

gorgeous choices.
Mrs. B - for a laugh, go click on your link to A.Lament's blog.

Blushing hostess said...

So very cultured, as I expected. Well done to you both. The Rose Tarlow bamboo thing is magnificent.

Style Court said...

I smiled when I saw Jaime Parladé's name here. Such interesting use of textiles.

Shandell's said...

Absolutely love your blog, I am so thrilled to see the 3/50 project on your blog, it is on my blog roll as well. The bedroom is my favorite in this post.
Susan

Rose C'est La Vie said...

i am in complete accord about the witty erudite and elegant Aesthete. The site is indispensable.
This is a gorgeous post, thank you.

Mrs. Blandings said...

Joni - aren't I just the most terrific knucklehead? Thanks for the heads up - I fixed it.

Pigtown-Design said...

Great choice. I love the obscure references that AL brings to our attention!

Can't wait to see House tomorrow. He's such a great guy!

mary said...

Thanks for featuring european designers--American design can be one-dimensional. We definitely need to expand our design horizons. Love those photos, more of Jaime Parlade, please.

Karena said...

Very classic and traditional designs that will endure. Beautiful!

little augury said...

Mrs Blandings- As usual AL is on the money. Grange is beyond most- already a foot in the iconic design league. I love all the picks, Rose Tarlow's home is one of a kind no doubt. I so agree with your reader about the formulaic magazine spreads in today's magazines (well said) la

Easy and Elegant Life said...

You would think that with the demise of so many shelter magazines, the remaining few would try to distinguish themselves wouldn't you?

I have come to rely on eyes like Aesthete's and yours to cull the best from the world over and send it my way. Where would I be without you? In even more of a confused muddle, no doubt.

home before dark said...

I am always impressed when vision, artistry, a love for the written word and a sense of history are combined in a home. Passion and a great love of beauty, combined with nerve and verve gets me ever time.

katiedid said...

I can see I will be adding the Grange book to my library ASAP. It does seem that there is a lack of European design lately doesn't it? Perhaps I will have to break down and spring for a World of Interiors subscription again. (p.s. thanks for the mention!)

An Aesthete's Lament said...

Thank you so much for this feature. And for asking me to participate. I do hope Isabel gets her website up and running again. She will blow your mind, as she has done mine, over and again.

victoria thorne said...

Rose Tarlow. Of course. How can we not love the AL's gift? Such beauty.

Patricia: so delighted - over the moon! - that you are creating these posts. They are delicious. Aesthete: two thumbs way up, as usual.

Emily Evans Eerdmans said...

For those interested, an English version of Jacques Grange's latest book is coming out this fall - complete with a different cover (although I prefer the French green-and-white one, I must say).

Mrs. Blandings said...

Emily - I do have this one on my wish list. I think I saw the covers and liked the French better myself. Inside that counts, I suppose.

soodie :: said...

Top two images of Jacque Grange reminds me of one of my all time favorites -- Josef Hoffmann -- and the incredible bathroom in the Palais Stoclet with the marbled walls, crystal chandelier and tulip green upholstered day bed. Love.

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