Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Kismet


A fair number of folks end up on my site because they are searching for George Terbovich, who happens to be an outstanding Kansas City-based designer and friend.


Very few of George's projects have been published.


In researching some historic homes in Kansas City I ran across the KC Modern blog which is a terrific resource for information on Kansas City architecture.

This is the Bernard Corrigan house by architect Louis S. Curtiss. I will send you to the link at KC Modern for more information about the house; I have been in it and it is extraordinary.


The design of these rooms, by Mr. Terbovich, was for a previous owner; they have been dismantled. When I saw these images earlier this week I was struck, not just by their beauty, but because the design does not overwhelm the architecture.

I think the restraint is stunning.

Images courtesy of KC Modern; photography by Gary Kabrink.

19 comments:

Martha said...

I've been in this home as well -- estate sale I think -- before it was redone. It's one of my favorites in the city.

Toad said...

The rooms take your breath away, but I can hardly take my eyes off the floors.

soodie :: said...

George Terbovich = such talent and in KC. I wish more of his work was published for all to see.

Louis Curtiss, a forgotten and eccentric architect, who brought to KC a unique vision from an exciting time in our architectural history. I love his houses. So many have been forgotten and are crumbling. Some great ones over in KCK.

David said...

Stunning is exactly the word for it. I would never have imagined a concrete building could feel so light.

The neighborhood Soodie's thinking of over in KCK is Westheights. My dad has a house there, sadly not a Curtiss house. If you've not been you should do a drive through.

Shani said...

What beautiful glass doors!

Kathy @ Creative Home Expressions said...

Gorgeous! He should be published, many could take cues and inspiration from his style.

MyLittleHappyPlace said...

Stunning, indeed!

home before dark said...

I am seeing the obvious: Mrs. B, you need to write the book on George's work. His work is worthy and you are more than up to the task.

Karena said...

This is stunning, I have not seen George's interior design work...love his shop.A little field trip over to Westheights would be awesome if David would give directions...!

mary said...

It seems that Mr. Terbovich has mastered the art of perfect balance... gorgeous work.

Mrs. Blandings said...

Toad - I. know.

Soodie - do check the KC Modern site - or perhaps you are familiar already - they have so much information on these homes and are doing a great job documenting the what and where.

David - will, definitely, check out Westheights. Do they do a Christmas tour? It's ringing a bell.

down pillow said...

I'd love to see this amazing place on a Christmas tour! Please tell me it's so!

Mrs. Blandings said...

down pillow - last year! darn!

shelbylynn said...

Absolutely beautiful. I love the clock down the stairwell.

Millie said...

Elegant, ethereal, timeless design. The parquetry floors in the entrance foyer are so beautiful, & it delights me to see them mostly uncovered. Once again you've shown us that KC really is a hidden treasure.
Millie ^_^

pve design said...

I vote for a day of blogging restraint...

Dumbwit Tellher ♥ said...

Incredible..incredible home. Thank you for sharing. I have yet to see a clock tower built into a staircase; stunning.I have happened across KC Modern, great blog. Thanks for the tour!

Deb

Karen Mills said...

Great Pic! Love his use of graphic elements throughout these rooms especially the vertical lines of the clock that draw you up the stairwell to see what lies beyond and the way the clock has become one with the house. Definitely a great guest possibility for Living Large design show and our new blog.

Carole Buschmann said...

I visit KC regularly to see my sister in Brookside. Each visit always includes a walk to see Terbovich's shop. I always feel so calm after each turn around his shop. I love your description, "the design does not overwhelm the architecture." Thank you for the other blog hints.